Top 5 Time Tracking Apps

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I once heard that time is akin to a stalking predator. Oh, you can try to outrun it with doctors, medicines, new technologies, but in the end, time is going to hunt you down and make the kill.

Okay, apologies for the obscure nod to Star Trek Generations, but Malcolm McDowell manages to ham up a good point: ignoring time can be a costly mistake. Is time really a predator, leaping for the throat? Probably not. But is it something you need to manage and take seriously? Definitely yes. In the workplace, time mismanagement (at best) leads to inefficiency and (at worst) will cut huge chunks from your profits.

Unfortunately, tracking employee hours can be a huge pain, both for employees and for managers. Sometimes, a simple punch card system is all that is needed, but in other situations, a more robust and complex solution is helpful.

Enter time tracking software! These apps are designed, in various ways, to help employers and employees not just keep track of how many hours they worked, but also schedule new hours, analyze efficiency, and even track tasks. The thing is, as with most SaaS varieties these days, there is an overwhelming number of options out there. Fortunately, we here at Merchant Maverick are in the business of doing research so you don’t have to. In that vein, what follows are our top five time tracking apps, based on price, features, and friendliness to employees and employers. Here we go! Starting with number 5 on the list…

Table of Contents

5. Timely

Timely (read our review) is a Norwegian-designed app that is attempting to re-define the industry. Capable of basic time sheets and scheduling, Timely also includes elements of project management software, allowing you to create and assign tasks to work on (tasks that can be directly linked to your timesheet). More impressive, though, is the Memory feature. Memory automatically tracks the physical locations you visit, the websites you use, and the tasks you are working on. Then, in a view available only to you, it presents an interactive timeline that allows you analyze exactly how you use your time (at your leisure, without the pressure of your boss breathing down your neck). It is a flashy feature that would normally put Timely higher up the list, but the cost of this app brings things back down. Timely costs, in its cheapest incarnation, $14/user/month. If you want some of the more advanced features, it will run you even more. Is the Memory feature worth the money? It really depends on how you plan to use it.

4. When I Work

When I Work is based in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Devoted to making waves in the time tracking industry, this app is currently available for the low, low price of 0$ (up to 75 users). If you want access to some “premium” features, you can shell out an extra $1 per user to get them. I was unable to find a comparable software at this price point, and actually, When I Work offers many of the same features as their competitors for a much lower price. Some highlights include GPS tracking (showing where you were when you clocked in), scheduling with automatic alerts, and analytics to help you figure out how to be more efficient.

3. Time Tracker By eBillity

The eBillity Time Tracker is a middle-of-the-road time tracker that offers most of the common features in the industry at a price low enough to be pretty seriously competitive. Those prices start in the $4/user/month range, but range as high as $12/user/month. In terms of features, eBillity’s Time Tracker has a mobile app, email alerts, and analytics, but lacks serious scheduling capabilities. It does, however, let users manually add hours, which is a feature I think makes good sense. If an employee forgets to clock in for some reason, you don’t want to make a huge headache out of reentering those hours. Strangely, this feature is not standard in the industry; comparatively few of the software programs I investigated offered this capability.

2. Homebase

Homebase has one of the best features of all time; a free option! Seriously, Homebase is a pretty impressive piece of software, providing you the capability to schedule, remind, and track shifts as an employer or an employee. While not all features are available in the free version, many are, and it is free for unlimited users. The free option was almost enough to take Homebase into the first slot, but it is missing two major features in an otherwise exemplary list: manual timesheet editing for all users and paid time off tracking. For me, the PTO tracking is less of a huge deal than the manual time entry. If someone forgets to clock in, you don’t want to go through a huge ordeal to correct their timesheet. Fortunately, Homebase does allow managers to correct timesheets, which balances things a bit

1. TSheets

Best Time Tracking Integrations

Here it is! The number one time tracking app! Honestly, the most impressive part of TSheets for me is its dedication to the employees that use it. The features list is impressive, to be sure, but I just appreciate that they take pains to make the use of their app simple and easy for the people that actually interact with it on a daily basis. Call it millennial bias, but I value people and making their lives easier; TSheets seems to do the same. Fortunately, this benevolent attitude is not the only thing that makes TSheets an attractive choice. While not the cheapest of the apps I looked into, it was also far from the most expensive ($4/person plus a $16 base fee). It also features GPS boundaries, manual time entry, an excellent mobile app, and PTO tracking.

Know about another time tracking app we didn’t mention? Enlighten us in the comments. Looking for something more robust? Read our comprehensive project management software reviews or compare top-rated apps.

Wesley Kriz is a writer from the misty peaks of the Pacific Northwest, or as he prefers to call it, the Best Coast. He is willing to debate on almost any topic, but he is admittedly very stubborn, so beware. When not writing for Merchant Maverick, Wesley is likely thinking about Star Wars, or reading Lord of the Rings.

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How To Add Customers In QuickBooks Pro

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How To Add Customers In QuickBooks Pro

One critical aspect of setting up your QuickBooks Pro accounts is adding contacts. Without contacts, you’ll have no customers to invoice.

We already explained one method of adding customers in our How to Import Customers Into QuickBooks Pro post, but you can also add customers manually.

Follow these simple steps to add customers into QuickBooks.

Table of Contents

Create A Contact

To add a customer in QuickBooks Pro, begin by going to Customers>Customer Center>New Customer.

Customer Information is divided into five sections: Address Info, Payment Settings, Sales Tax Settings, Additional Info, and Job Status. The only section that is truly required is Address Information, but we’ll go over each. We’ve divided this post to reflect these categories for easy navigation.

Step 1: Enter Contact’s Name

Type your contact’s name.

How to Add Customers in QuickBooks Pro

Step 2: Add An Opening Balance (optional)

You can add an opening balance for pre-existing customers.

How to Add Customers in QuickBooks Pro

If you add an opening balance, you’ll also need to select “as of” date. You can click on the blue “How do I determine an opening balance?” link for more details.

How to Add Customers in QuickBooks Pro

Add Address Information

Step 3: Enter The Company Name

Add the company name associated with your contact.

How to Add Customers in QuickBooks Pro

Step 4: Write Contact’s Full Name

Enter your contact’s full name and title.

How to Add Customers in QuickBooks Pro

Step 5: Add Contact’s Job Title

Fill in your contact’s job title.

How to Add Customers in QuickBooks Pro

Step 6: Record Contact Details

Use the drop-down menus to save eight fields of contact details. You can choose to save the following contact information:

  • Main Phone
  • Home Phone
  • Work Phone
  • Mobile
  • Alt. Phone
  • Alt. Mobile
  • Main Email
  • CC Email
  • Alt. Email 1
  • Alt. Email 2
  • Website
  • LinkedIn
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • URL 1
  • URL 2
  • URL 3
  • URL 4
  • Skype ID
  • Other 1
  • Other 2
  • Other 3

How to Add Customers in QuickBooks Pro

Step 7: Add A Billing Address

Edit your contact’s address information.

How to Add Customers in QuickBooks Pro

Step 8: Add A Shipping Address

If your contact’s shipping address is the same as their billing address, click “Copy>>.” If not, fill in the proper shipping address now. Then click the blue “OK” button.

How to Add Customers in QuickBooks Pro

Adjust Payment Settings

Step 9: Add An Account Number

Add an account number for your contact (if applicable).

How to Add Customers in QuickBooks Pro

Step 10: Select Default Payment Terms

Select the proper default terms for your customer. These terms will appear on every estimate or invoice you send to your customer (though the defaults can be overridden or changed at any time). You can choose between:

  • 1% 10 Net 30
  • 2% 10 net 30
  • Consignment
  • Dues on Receipt
  • Net 15
  • Net 30
  • Net 60

How to Add Customers in QuickBooks Pro

Step 11: Select A Preferred Delivery Method

Choose a preferred delivery method that will be used when you send estimates and invoices to your contact. You can choose between:

  • Email
  • Mail
  • None

How to Add Customers in QuickBooks Pro

Step 12: Set A Credit Limit

You can set an optional credit limit for your customer if desired.

How to Add Customers in QuickBooks Pro

Step 13: Select A Price Level

QuickBooks allows you to create price levels, which are basically a means of offering custom pricing for customers or jobs. You can add one now or click the blue question mark to learn more about this feature.

How to Add Customers in QuickBooks Pro

Step 14: Record Contact’s Credit Card Information

QuickBooks Pro gives you the option to save a contact’s credit card information if desired. You can add the credit card number, expiration date, name on card, address, and zip code.

How to Add Customers in QuickBooks Pro

Step 15: Enable Payments

You can opt to let your customers pay you via credit card or bank transfer. You’ll need to create a QuickBooks Payments account first. Once you’ve created an account, click the appropriate boxes for how you want your customer to pay (or come back and edit this later).

How to Add Customers in QuickBooks Pro

Edit Sales Tax Settings

Step 16: Include A Customer Tax Code

In order to save a default sales tax rate to your customer, you’ll need to select “Tax” from the Tax Code drop-down menu. If you don’t want to charge sales tax to this customer, select “Non.”

How to Add Customers in QuickBooks Pro

Step 17: Select A Default Sales Tax

Select a default sales tax to charge your customer (you can override the default when creating estimates and invoices).

How to Add Customers in QuickBooks Pro

Step 18: Add A Resale Number

You can choose to add a resale number if you’d like.

How to Add Customers in QuickBooks Pro

Add Additional Info

Step 19: Specify A Customer Type

Use the drop-down menu to note where this customer came from. You can choose:

  • From advertisement
  • Referral
  • Retail
  • Wholesale

How to Add Customers in QuickBooks Pro

Step 20: Link To A Sales Rep

If you want to link this customer to a specific sales representative, choose the appropriate employee using the drop-down menu.

How to Add Customers in QuickBooks Pro

Step 21: Create Custom Fields

You can create a custom field for your contact. Click the “Define Fields” button in the bottom right-hand corner of the screen. Then write a label for your custom field and select whether that custom field applies to contact, vendors, or employees.

How to Add Customers in QuickBooks Pro

Record Job Info

Step 22: Enter A Job Description

Add a job description for the project attached to your customer.

How to Add Customers in QuickBooks Pro

Step 33: Choose A Job Type

Choose whether this job is commercial or residential.

How to Add Customers in QuickBooks Pro

Step 34: Set A Job Status

Set a current status for this project. You can choose between:

  • None
  • Pending
  • Awarded
  • In progress
  • Closed
  • Not awarded

How to Add Customers in QuickBooks Pro

Step 35: Mark The Start Date, Projected End Date, & End Date

Use the calendars to set a project start date, projected end date, and end date (if available).

How to Add Customers in QuickBooks Pro

Step 36: Save The Contact

Finally, you can save your contact by clicking the blue “OK” button on the bottom of the screen.

How to Add Customers in QuickBooks Pro

You can view your customer list or go back to the Customer Center to make sure the customer saved correctly. Repeat this process as many times as needed until all of your customers are successfully added to your QuickBooks account.

If you have any troubleshooting issues, check out the QuickBooks Community or call QuickBooks directly. If you have any further questions, leave a comment below and we’ll do our best to help you.

Chelsea Krause

Chelsea Krause is a writer, avid reader, and researcher. In addition to loving writing, she became interested in accounting software because of her constant desire to learn something new and understand how things work. When she’s not working or daydreaming about her newest story, she can be found drinking obscene amounts of coffee, reading anything written by C.S. Lewis or Ray Bradbury, kayaking and hiking, or watching The X-Files with her husband.

Chelsea Krause

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The Debate Over Patreon’s New Fee Policy: Who Benefits, And Who Doesn’t?

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patreon fees

When Patreon (see our review) announced a change in their fee structure, they touted it as a way to ensure that creators were paid a greater portion of what is pledged to them. However, many in the global creative community immediately perceived it as a threat to the viability — and thus the livelihood — of smaller creators on the site. What are the motives behind this change, and what will be its effect?

Table of Contents

The Change: Payment Processing Fees Will Now Be Assessed To Patrons

The simple way to summarize the change is to say that the payment processing fees charged in the transfer of funds from patron to creator will now be charged to the patron (rather than to the creator, as was the case in the past). But this broad explanation glosses over the specifics of how patrons will be charged, and it’s these specifics which lie at the heart of the issue.

Prior to December 18, 2017 — the day the new fee regime takes effect — Patreon’s policy was to charge the content creator for the cost of payment processing, deducting the amount from the earnings, which were bundled together and paid out once per month. This amount would vary, both month-to-month and creator-to-creator, because it depended on the number and amount of the individual pledges you received from your patrons, not the sum total of your patrons’ contributions.

As of the 18th, this all changes. Creators won’t be charged a fee for payment processing, and will instead pay only the 5% platform fee Patreon has always charged. Patrons will now be charged a 2.9% + $0.35 fee on each individual pledge they make to a Patreon campaign.

To those not involved in crowdfunding, the significance of this change may not be immediately apparent, and, in fact, it was initially presented by Patreon as an unalloyed good. According to the company’s much-criticised first statement, the change was made because it “allows Patreon creators to take home exactly 95% of every pledge, with no additional fees.”

However, here’s the thing. To charge a 2.9% + $0.35 fee to a patron’s every individual pledge adds a significant burden to patrons, most especially those who contribute a small amount — often $1 — to several different creators.

Seriously, though, it’s a big hit to small contributions! You might see the 2.9%, or even the $0.35, and think “well, that doesn’t sound like a big deal.” But the truly significant part is that this fee is charged to your every individual pledge and not assessed to your total monthly donation. This means every $1 pledge you make to a creator — whether monthly or per creation — will cost you $1.38. That’s a 38% fee you’re now paying on your donation, which sounds a lot worse than “2.9% + $0.35.” So if you contribute to, say, 20 different Patreons at $1/month each, you’ll now be paying $27.60 instead of $20.

This issue is especially acute if you run a per-creation Patreon. According to their FAQ explaining the changes, Patreon states the following:

As a per-post creator, your patrons will see the 2.9% + $0.35 service fee added to all paid posts. For example, if you are a per post creator making two paid posts per month, your patrons will be charged 2.9% + $0.35 for each paid post.

This means your $1-per-post patron will be paying $2.76 over the month for $2 worth of content, and not the $2.41 that would be assessed if the patron’s per-creation charges were bundled by month and then had the fee assessed. This disparity gets more pronounced the more prolific the per-post creator.

For the patron, it’s the aggregation of the per-pledge fees that is so insidious. This is particularly the case if you divide your giving into small amounts sent to many different creators, and less so if you give larger amounts to fewer creators.

The Criticism

Backlash was swift and unforgiving, ricocheting remorselessly down the weary corridors of social media. Many creators recognized this change as a massive new disincentive for patrons to spread their wealth, in the form of small pledges, among many different campaigners, with the new payment regime incentivizing patrons to concentrate their giving to fewer creators. The primary beneficiary of this change, according to many, is Patreon itself, not the majority of creators (and certainly not patrons). Crystallizing this view, a recent VentureBeat article quotes indie developer George Buckenham as describing the change like so:

This especially disincentivizes people pledging single dollars per month to multiple creators, which I assume they factored in and are happy with, in favour of people backing fewer projects for larger amounts of money.

The effects of the change are already being felt. Many Patreon creators tweeted screenshots of the canceled pledges they had already experienced, often accompanied by patrons giving the new fee structure as their reason for cutting back. Artist Blue Delliquanti noted in just such a tweet that they had already lost the equivalent of the cost of their dental insurance.

Artist/writer Josh Fruhlinger responded to the change by offering his $2-level patrons the chance to resubscribe at $1.60 per month for a unique reward to induce them to stay while paying roughly the same $2 monthly rate. Again, Patreon made this change ostensibly to benefit creators, yet now we see creators effectively cutting their own take just to keep their patrons from fleeing.

Yet another oft-heard complaint was that this change would be especially hard on non-US creators and patrons, considering the extra costs per transaction already incurred with the currency exchange, VAT, etc.

The Response

After the first wave of reaction, Patreon issued a further explanation of their new fee system through their payments product manager. The statement is an emphatic denial that the move is profit-motivated — “This was never (and still isn’t) about making more money for Patreon as a company.” Instead, they link the change to a change in the way patrons are going to be billed in the future. The explanation is complex, and I had to read through it a few times before I really understood it, but it boils down to the fact that Patreon wants to offer all creators the ability to get paid up-front when patrons subscribe to their content. This option has often been requested by creators who have to deal with the possibility of patrons signing up for their content and then canceling before the first payment is made.

However, when they let certain creators use a “monthly-with-charge-up-front” charging method, patrons were miffed. Because a patron’s monthly subscriptions are bundled and paid on the first of the month, a patron who signs up to support a creator with charge-up-front enabled on November 29th is charged a full month’s fee immediately, and then again on December 1st for the next month’s content. To prevent patrons from being effectively double-charged like this, Patreon wants to change the payment system to one in which each patron’s monthly subscription is paid on the monthly anniversary of the date on which they signed up with the creator in question.

But if they do this without changing the way payment processing fees are charged, according to Patreon, the cost of these fees will shoot up for creators and take a bigger cut of their monthly takes, because their patron’s payments will be spaced out over the month and not bundled and paid on the first of the month as before. They therefore justify the new fee system as a way to prevent this scenario from happening. They also added the fact that this new 2.9% + $0.35 was the lowest of the fee amounts they had experimented with during testing. “Be grateful we’re not making it even worse!” they seem to be saying.

As you can imagine, this response was not universally accepted.

Reaction To The Response

Many in the creative community, like author Natalie Luhrs, did not accept that soaking small donations with such a steep fee increase was the only way to make charge-up-front charging work. Several people pointed to another aspect of Patreon’s new billing practices which wasn’t addressed by the company in their “here’s why we did this” response but is mentioned in the FAQ page they put up to detail the changes. As things stand now, creators who are patrons of other creators can pay said creators out of their Patreon balance to avoid subjecting the funds in their balances to a second round of fees. However, according to Patreon,

We will likely be changing the way creator to creator payments happen in the future so that you will no longer be able to use your Patreon balance. One reason is that it causes many edge cases that add complexity to our payments system as work to roll out charge upfront over the course of 2018.

Of course, in smoothing out these “edge cases,” Patreon will just happen to collect more in fees as a result.

The Motivation And The Effect

Naturally, opinions differ on Patreon’s true motivation for enacting these fee changes. Natalie Luhrs pointed to this article, from June 2017, in which a Patreon employee explicitly states that “financially successful Creators” are more valuable to the company than creators who earn less money (“We’d rather have our GMV [gross merchandise volume] be made up of fewer, but truly life-changed creators rather than a lot of creators making a few dollars.” is a rather telling quote.). Luhrs claims this is evidence that Patreon is intentionally trying to prioritize big earners over small-time earners on the platform. If this is the case, there is no small irony in the fact that Patreon’s highest-earning project — and therefore its most “financially successful” — is a socialist podcast that has come out swinging against the new fee policy.

Others point to different possible motivations. Developer Jason Yu theorized that the real reason behind the change was not Patreon’s desire to effectively gentrify the ranks of its creators but to minimize costly instances of patrons getting confused and disputing charges that they made because they didn’t realize they were being aggregated by Patreon — the example given was a patron who makes 20 $1 monthly contributions and disputes a $20 charge from Patreon because they don’t recognize it. (Jason nonetheless concludes that “Unfortunately for Patreon, they may find that this change only shifts payment fraud to other channels while angering their creators and patrons in the process.”)

The fact is that we don’t have access to Patreon’s internal deliberations, so it may not be possible to pinpoint Patreon’s exact motivations for making this move. However, we don’t need to know the motivations behind the move to objectively assess its effects. It’s clear that the fee changes, as proposed, will make the act of contributing small amounts of money to many different Patreon campaigns much more expensive in percentage terms. These new fees, at 2.9% + $0.35 per individual pledge, plainly incentivize patrons to concentrate their Patreon spending on fewer creators in order to cut down on the number of times they’ll be forced to pass these new virtual toll booths. This can only have the effect of shifting patron spending up the ladder, benefitting larger creators at the expense of the smaller ones. Chalk up a rare win for the beleaguered 1%!

Final Thoughts

Don’t hold me to this, but I suspect Patreon will survive the current controversy. The most popular creators will see a net increase in the amount of revenue they take in, as they’ll be able to count on getting 95% of what is pledged to them. Patreon will continue to grow, and they will point to this growth to retrospectively justify this month’s change in their fee policy. But the numbers won’t tell the whole story. Creators will be left having to hope that their increased cut will be enough to cover the losses incurred from other patrons dropping or reducing their support. On this count, the big, established creators are obviously better positioned than the small-time creators.

Wasn’t the original intent of rewards crowdfunding to give a leg up to these very same small-time creators? To help them get the recognition they deserve in a world increasingly dominated by those who can leverage their existing advantages for their enduring benefit? Patreon might see increased aggregate growth from this move, but at what cost to those who Patreon might not define as “financially successful Creators” who have been “truly life-changed” but who rely on the platform to earn a few extra bucks to help make ends meet?

We know that when questions of this nature are ignored, the result is a society ever more aggressively stratified by wealth and power, so perhaps it’s high time these issues were given the consideration they urgently require.

Jason Vissers

Jason Vissers is a writer, cereal chef and Netflix aficionado from San Diego. A native Californian who enjoys the beach, Jason nonetheless prefers to do his surfing on the World Wide Web, the raddest wave of them all. Jason can’t eat raisins.

Jason Vissers

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What Is A Loan-To-Value Ratio (LTV)?

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If you’re investigating hard money loans, a type of private lending used to purchase or upgrade real estate, you’ve probably come across an unfamiliar acronym: LTV. We’ll take a look at what LTV is and the role it plays in lending.

Table of Contents

What Is A Loan-To-Value Ratio?

LTV stands for Loan-To-Value ratio. While it plays a more pronounced role in hard money, LTV isn’t unique to hard money loans. Banks also use the LTV ratio in their calculations when they write a mortgage.

Simply put, LTV is a number that represents the approximate risk of the loan to the lender. This number is expressed as a percentage. The higher the number, the greater the risk to the lender.

How Is It Calculated?

LTV is actually a pretty straightforward calculation. Simply take the amount borrowed, divide it by the value of the property, and convert it to a percentage. For example, if you’ve taken out a $100,000 loan on a piece of property estimated to be worth $140,000, your LTV would be 71%. ($100,000 / $140,000 = 0.7142.)

As that number increases, the lender takes on more risk. A lender that finances 100% of the property value is providing full financing. If the LTV climbs above 100%, the borrower is considered to be underwater. Banks will usually only offer higher LTV loans to customers with excellent credit.

The value of the property is usually determined by an appraiser, although some lenders will use a different metric. Hard money lenders, for example, may use the property’s after repair value (ARV) rather than its current market value.

What Role Does LTV Play In Hard Money Loans?

Hard money lenders use LTV to assess risk just like more traditional lending institutions. There are some small differences in how they use it, however. Because of the higher risk involved with hard money lending, the lenders have to consider the strong possibility that the borrower will default.

Whereas banks might heavily factor credit into their calculations along with LTV, hard money lenders will weight LTV substantially more than credit. Some lenders may not care about credit at all. As a counterbalance, they tend to use the equity the borrower puts into the property as a security. Effectively, this means hard money lenders will, in most cases, look for a lower LTV than a bank would.

How much are they willing to cover? The answer is a bit tricky. In addition to any background checks the hard money lender may decide to factor in, the property’s qualities will be considered. Properties in booming real estate markets and “up-and-coming” neighborhoods may push the lender’s LTV tolerance close to 75%, often considered the upper limit for hard money. In contrast, a property in a poor market, or a remote one, will push the maximum LTV closer to zero.

Similarly, the state of the property will play a large role in how much risk the hard money lender is willing to take on. The better the state of the property, the higher the LTV can go.

Remember that some lenders will calculate the LTV based on the ARV of the property. This is most likely to happen when you’re borrowing money to rehabilitate a property.

How Important Is It To Understand Your LTV Ratio?

At the risk of being evasive, let’s just say that it can’t hurt to understand how your lender is making their underwriting decisions to make sure you’re getting a good deal. On the other hand, you’ll end up seeing the LTV eventually in the form of the amount of money they offer you. The most important thing to remember is that the more the lender is willing to cover, the higher they’ve assessed the value of the property.

Final Thoughts

Hopefully this overview has given you a basic understanding of what LTV is and how it’s used in real estate transactions. If you’re looking for other options for business loans, check out our handy guide.

Chris Motola

Chris Motola is an independent writer, journalist, programmer, and game designer who has mastered the art of using his laptop in no fewer than 541 positions, most of them unergonomic. When he’s not pushing keys or swiping screens, he’s probably out exploring urban or natural environs, experimenting in the kitchen, or delighting/annoying his friends with his ideas and theories.

Chris Motola

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Shopify Payments Review: What Are The Pros And Cons Of Shopify’s Integrated Payment Processor?

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If you’ve spent any time on our blog, you know that Shopify (read our review) is one of our favorite shopping cart solutions, primarily because they provide an all-inclusive solution to a wide range of merchants. One monthly rate gives you access to Shopify’s hosting, security, administrative abilities, customer service features, inventory management features, web design tools, and more.

With the addition of Shopify Payments, an integrated payment processor, you can even access built-in payment processing features. Shopify Payments allows you to quickly begin accepting orders on your online store. You won’t have to worry about integrating a third-party processor, and Shopify will waive their shopping cart transaction fees.

However, despite its convenience, Shopify Payments is not a perfect solution. Customers often complain that they do not qualify to use the service. Others say that Shopify Payments has frozen their account or is holding payments.

Keep reading to learn if you qualify for Shopify Payments and if it’s right for your business.

In this article, we’ll be discussing payment service providers (PSPs). If you’re new to the world of payment processing, we’d love to help get you oriented. Download our free ebook, The Beginner’s Guide to Payment Processing, to get started.

Table of Contents

What Is Shopify Payments?

Shopify Payments is a payment processor that allows you to accept customers’ money securely on your account. Shopify is responsible for these transactions, although they are effectively processed through Stripe and Wells Fargo.

Shopify Payments is already integrated into your Shopify account, so it requires very little setup. There is no need to integrate a third-party processor or coordinate payments with a separate company. All you have to do is select Shopify Payments in your admin and add your banking information. Read Shopify’s setup instructions.

What’s more, Shopify Payments comes with a few additional features, including chargeback management and fraud prevention.

When you use Shopify Payments, Shopify will waive their usual shopping cart transaction fees. The only transaction fees you’ll need to pay are those associated with payment processing.

What Are The Rates?

Every PSP comes with its own processing rates and fees. Shopify Payments bases their rates on users’ subscription level. Users on higher Shopify plans benefit from lower rates. Take a look at the screenshot below for a breakdown of those rates.

Shopify states that they do not charge any monthly fees, hidden fees, or setup fees on their payments service.

Who Can Use Shopify Payments?

Perhaps the most obvious requirement is that you must be a Shopify customer to use Shopify Payments.

Shopify Payments is only available to merchants in the US, Canada, the UK, Ireland, Australia, New Zealand, and Singapore. Shopify Payments is not available to US territories, with the exception of Puerto Rico.

You must follow Shopify’s Acceptable Use Policy. Take a look at the extensive list of products and services Shopify does not support below:

If you do not comply with Shopify Payments’ Terms of Service, you will not be approved or the service may be revoked.

When Do I Get Paid?

Payday is on everyone’s mind. One of the most frequently-asked questions regarding Shopify Payments is how long you’ll have to wait to receive your customers’ payments.

This period — the time between when a customer places an order and when those funds are sent to your bank account — is called a pay period. You should keep in mind that this pay period does not include the amount of time it takes for your bank to process that deposit after it’s sent (typically between 24-72 hours).

Your pay period with Shopify Payments will depend on the country in which your company is based. You can view the full breakdown of pay periods in Shopify’s knowledgebase, or you can see my summary below:

  • US: 2 business days. Funds from Friday, Saturday, and Sunday are grouped and sent together as one payment.
  • Canada: 3 business days. Funds from Friday, Saturday, and Sunday are grouped and sent together as one payment.
  • Australia: 3 business days. Funds from Saturday, Sunday, and Monday are grouped and sent together as one payment.
  • New Zealand: 3 business days. Funds from Saturday, Sunday, and Monday are grouped and sent together as one payment.
  • UK & Ireland: 4 business days. Funds from Saturday, Sunday, and Monday are grouped and sent together as one payment.

Make sure you keep in mind this delay in payments as you plan your business. It might be worth setting up a business credit card so you always have funds on hand.

Pros & Positive Reviews

Customers choose Shopify Payments for a number of reasons. Here are the primary benefits of using Shopify Payments:

  • No Shopify Transaction Fees: While there will always be processing fees, when you use Shopify Payments, you’ll no longer have to pay that 1%-2% transaction fee associated with your Shopify plan. I assume Shopify instead takes their money from your payment processing. Either way, it’s savings for you.
  • Potentially Lower Processing Fees: As I’ve said before, higher-level Shopify merchants benefit from lower rates. You may find that Shopify’s rates are competitive with those of other major processors.
  • Already Integrated: You won’t need any developers to connect with Shopify Payments.
  • Integrated Fraud Prevention: Shopify Payments helps you reduce fraudulent transactions. You can choose to enable an address verification system and a card verification value upon checkout to ensure customers are real cardholders. Read more about fraud analysis.

Shopify Payments is a great solution if you meet the requirements and are looking for a processor that’s easy to integrate.

Cons & Complaints

While Shopify Payments is great for convenience, I’ve seen numerous reports blaming the service for being unreliable and difficult to contact. Here are a few of the most common complaints and disadvantages of using Shopify Payments:

  • Ineligibility: Shopify users often complain that they are not eligible for Shopify Payments. For some, this is because Shopify Payments is not available in their country. In some cases, Shopify has actually revoked payment services because, for one reason or another, their business was deemed “high-risk.” Shopify’s Terms of Service states: “We reserve the right to modify or terminate the Service for any reason, without notice at any time.”
  • Shopify Holds Funds: Merchants frequently complain of their funds being withheld for an extended period of time. Here’s what Shopify Payments’ Terms Of Service says about that: “Stripe, on behalf of Shopify and/or Wells Fargo reserves the right to change the Payout Schedule or suspend payouts to your Bank Account should we determine it is necessary due to pending disputes, excessive Chargebacks or refunds, or other suspicious activity associated with your use of the Service or it required by law or court order.”
  • Difficulties With Chargebacks: Chargebacks are an unfortunate and inevitable part of running an online business. If customers file too many chargebacks against you, Shopify may withhold your funds, further complicating the issue.

Make sure you read the Terms of Service for every solution you sign up with, including Shopify and Shopify Payments. It could save you a world of pain.

Final Thoughts

I’ve seen enough negative reports about Shopify Payments to be skeptical of the service. Many merchants have been denied payments or had the service revoked entirely.

However, without the specifics, it’s difficult to determine whether Shopify was justified or not in these actions. If merchants were not complying with Shopify Payments’ Terms of Service, Shopify was within their rights to cancel the service.

As you make your decision, read every word of Shopify Payments’ Terms of Service to ensure your business qualifies. There are some great benefits to integrated payments, and if your store follows all the rules, Shopify Payments could be the best choice for your store.

But, don’t stop your research there. Take a look at our complete review of Shopify (and the real customer comments below) to learn more about the software, and be sure to read up on Shopify Payments in their knowledgebase. Best of luck!

Liz Hull

Liz is a recent college graduate living in Washington state. As of late, she can often be found haunting eCommerce forums and waiting on hold with customer service representatives. When she’s free, Liz loves to rock climb, watch Spanish dramas, and read poorly-written young adult novels.

Liz Hull

“”

4 Ways Businesses Can Use Hard Money Loans

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In an environment where debts are high and credit tight, non-traditional forms of funding start to fill in the gaps. Within the real estate development industry, one popular form of alternative lending is hard money.

Table of Contents

What Is A Hard Money Loan?

Hard money is a form of private lending secured by property. Since these private contracts largely evade the regulations that govern banking, the terms are governed more by the whims of the lender than anything. However, hard money loans have a few things in common:

  • Fast: A simplified underwriting process means you can get the money much more quickly.
  • Expensive: Expect interest rates in the mid-to-upper teens. You’ll also pay a larger origination fee (2 – 10 percent) than you would with a bank.
  • Short-term: It’s rare for a hard money loan to last longer than five years. Most will last less than one.
  • Negotiable: You have a bit more leeway to haggle with a private lender than you do with a financial institution.
  • Based On Prospective Value: Hard money loans rely on a calculation called loan-to-value ratio. This ratio is based on the potential value of the property. So while a hard money loan will usually only cover a percentage of the property’s cost, that percentage is based on the property’s prospective value, not its current value.

Below, we’ll take a look at how hard money is used by businesses in commercial development.

Buying Property

One of the most straightforward ways for businesses to use hard money is to buy land. As a general rule, hard money lenders are looking for borrowers who also view the property as an investment. While there are exceptions, many frown upon owner-occupier arrangments — for example, intending to build an apartment complex that you’ll also reside in. This usually isn’t a big deal for businesses, but it’s a good thing to keep in mind.

To get the most out of your hard money loan, you’ll want to select a property that you feel is undervalued with the intent of cleaning it up and/or building upon it.

Stop-Gap Funding

In some cases, businesses will use the speedy process offered by hard money to secure a property until they can refinance through less expensive, more traditional means. You’ll want to be pretty sure that your bank loan will come through so you don’t get stuck paying high-interest rates any longer than you have to.

New Construction

Whether you’re acquiring a new property or already own one, a common way of increasing its value is to build something people want on it. This can be residential, commercial, or mixed-use. You will, of course, need to be familiar with the municipality’s zoning laws.

In some cases, the property may already have an obsolete structure on it, in which case you’ll have to take into account the cost of tearing down that structure as well.

Many hard money borrowers will then sell the property at a profit, paying off their hard money loan in the process.

Rehabilitation

Sometimes there’s a serviceable structure already on the property, but it’s outdated or in disrepair. This is the iconic fix-and-flip scenario that was popular before the 2008 financial crash. The difference is you’re dealing with private investor money rather than subprime bank loans.

The fix-and-flip strategy tends to work best in “hot” real estate markets, where you can be relatively sure that your rehabilitated property will sell, and sell quickly.

Final Thoughts

Remember that the idea behind hard money is to get in quickly, increase the value of your purchase, and make your exit. It’s a high-risk, high-reward strategy for developers and renovators who can’t access the funds they need within a critical timeframe. You’ll want to approach hard money lender cautiously, with a good idea of what you’re getting into.

Not sure what other loans are available? Check out our guide.

Chris Motola

Chris Motola is an independent writer, journalist, programmer, and game designer who has mastered the art of using his laptop in no fewer than 541 positions, most of them unergonomic. When he’s not pushing keys or swiping screens, he’s probably out exploring urban or natural environs, experimenting in the kitchen, or delighting/annoying his friends with his ideas and theories.

Chris Motola

“”

Sales Tax Items VS Sales Tax Groups in QuickBooks Pro

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Sales Tax Item vs. Sales Tax Rates in QuickBooks Pro

Are you trying to add a sales tax rate to your QuickBooks Pro account but aren’t sure whether to use a sales tax item or sales tax rate? You’ve come to the right place.

Small business sales tax can be straight-up byzantine, and navigating QuickBooks Pro is equally disorienting at times. In this post, we’ll clearly explain the difference between sales tax items and sales tax groups in QuickBooks. We’ll also help you choose which method is right for your business using accounting advice from real CPAs. Because when it comes to small business sales tax, you simply can’t take chances.

Table of Contents

What’s The Difference Between A Sales Tax Item & A Sales Tax Group?

If you’ve read our Small Business Sales Tax Guide, you know that sales tax is a bit confusing–especially when different states, counties, and even cites charge different tax rates. We’ve contacted real CPAs for their expert advice on handling sales tax rates. But first, we’ll define sales tax item and sales tax group.

A sales tax item is a single tax rate; a sales tax group is a collection of individual sales tax rates that are added together to create a single rate.

Here’s an example. Say you are charging sales tax to a customer in King City, California. King City has a city tax of 0.75% and California has a state tax of 7.5%.

If you were to create a sales tax item, you would impose a blanket tax rate of 8.25%.

If you were to create a sales tax group, you would create one sales tax item for King City and another for California. Add 0.75% to 7.5% for a total group sales tax rate of 8.25%.

When Should You Use A Sales Tax Item?

Tiffany Powell, owner of Sapphire Bookkeeping & Accounting Inc, says:

We generally only recommend using a single tax rate when you are paying all parts of your sales tax to one entity.

Ultimately, it comes down to the individual state rules and whether or not the state requires you to report city, county, and state tax separately.

There’s one other case where you may want to use a single sales tax item in QuickBooks. According to Powell:

You can also use a single rate item when you are listing invoices for Resale or Non-taxable so that you can keep track of amounts excluded from sales tax.

Sally Balson of Balson Bookkeeping Company, LLC, gives the same advice to her clients:

I do also caution my clients to know the difference between non-taxable sales and exempt sales.  You can sell to a church, for example, who is exempt from sales tax but the items you sold are taxable items. Most states require you report sales to exempt organizations separate from non-taxable sales. Then also keep track of the sales tax you paid on item you resell or use to manufacture an item for sale. States allow you to deduct this cost from your sales tax obligation, so you are not double taxing the items.

When Should You Use A Sales Tax Group?

While there are cases where you may want to employ a sales tax item, most small businesses will generally use sales tax groups.

Balson says:

If you operate in multiple counties and/or multiple states, then a Sales Tax Group is better. This allows you to track each collection.  Also, the Sales Tax Group allows you to reuse common Sales Tax Items; for example, you operate in 3 counties and 1 city with sales tax but you have to collect state tax for all those locations so you would set up a group with the state item in each group. On the report you will see a line totaling the state tax collected, each county tax collected, and the city tax collected including the amount of sales for each of those locations.

Many states require small businesses to show the separate sales tax collected from each city or county. But this isn’t the only reason to use sales tax groups. Sales tax groups often look cleaner on invoices.

CPA Timothy L. Shore shares:

Using the sales tax item could result in separate line items on an invoice for the state, county and local tax. Therefore,  it is better to use the sales tax group which is used to individually track the separate locales, but the customer only sees one sales tax [rate] on their invoice.

And according to Powell, there is another advantage to sales tax groups:

This is also helpful if a city changes their sales tax rate. You are then able to update just the item rate and it will then automatically update the group rate.

Final Thoughts

Now that you know the difference between sales tax items and sales tax groups, read How to Add Sales Tax Rates In QuickBooks Pro for step by step instructions on adding rates to your QuickBooks account. If you’re still not sure which method is right for your small business, read our Small Business Sales Tax Guide and/or consult your accountant for advice.

Chelsea Krause

Chelsea Krause is a writer, avid reader, and researcher. In addition to loving writing, she became interested in accounting software because of her constant desire to learn something new and understand how things work. When she’s not working or daydreaming about her newest story, she can be found drinking obscene amounts of coffee, reading anything written by C.S. Lewis or Ray Bradbury, kayaking and hiking, or watching The X-Files with her husband.

Chelsea Krause

“”

How To Add Sales Tax Rates In QuickBooks Pro

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How to Add Sales Tax in QuickBooks Pro

I’m sure you’re probably itching to send your first invoice with your new QuickBooks Pro software, but you can’t accurately charge your customers without sales tax. (And you can’t be on the good side of the government without having accurate sales tax records.)

In QuickBooks Pro, there are two different ways of creating sales tax rates within the software: sales tax items and sales tax groups. We’ll explain how to add both a sales tax item and a sales tax rate step by step.

If you need help deciding whether to use sales tax items or sales tax groups, read our post on Sales Tax Items vs. Sales Tax Groups in QuickBooks Pro, or continue on to learn how to start collecting sales tax in no time.

Table of Contents

Add A Sales Tax Item

Now that you know the difference between sales tax items and groups, we’ll teach you how to create them using your QuickBooks software.

To begin adding a sales tax item, go to Edit>Preferences>Sales Tax>My Customer.

Step 1: Enable Sales Tax

Before you can add a Sales Tax Item, you’ll need to make sure your company is set up to collect sales tax.

QuickBooks Pro will ask you the question, “Do you charge sales tax?” Make sure “Yes” is selected.

Step 2: Add A New Sales Tax Item

Click the “Add sales tax item…” box.

How To Add Sales Tax In QuickBooks Pro

You’ll be taken to a screen that looks like this:

How To Add Sales Tax In QuickBooks Pro

Make sure the “Sales Tax Item” is checked.

Step 3: Create A Sales Tax Name

Create a name for you Sales Tax Item.

How To Add Sales Tax In QuickBooks Pro

Step 4: Write A Sales Tax Description

Customize your sales tax description.

How To Add Sales Tax In QuickBooks Pro

Step 5: Add A Tax Rate

Add the appropriate sales tax percentage rate. If you need help determining what this rate should be, refer to our Small Business Sales Tax Guide.

How To Add Sales Tax In QuickBooks Pro

Step 6: Select The Tax Agency

Use the drop-down menu to select the appropriate sales tax agency. The sales tax agency is the legal entity for which you collect sales tax. If you need help finding the right sales tax agency, refer to our Small Business Sales Tax Guide.

How To Add Sales Tax In QuickBooks Pro

You most likely will need to create a brand new vendor for your tax agency. You can do so by clicking “.” Then, fill in the appropriate information and press “OK” to save your new tax agency.

How To Add Sales Tax In QuickBooks Pro

Step 7: Save Your Sales Tax Item

Click the blue “OK” button to save your sales tax item.

How To Add Sales Tax In QuickBooks Pro

Congratulations! You’ve created your first sales tax item. Repeat the process as many times as needed to get all of your sales tax rates added to QuickBooks.

Add A Sales Tax Group

Before you add a sales tax group, you’ll need to create the individual components of the sales tax group as sales tax items. Follow the “How To Add A Sales Item” instructions.

To begin adding a sales tax group, go to Edit>Preferences>Sales Tax>My Customer.

Step 1Add A New Sales Tax Group

Begin by clicking the “Add sales tax item…”

How To Add Sales Tax In QuickBooks Pro

You’ll be taken to a screen that looks like this:

How To Add Sales Tax In QuickBooks Pro

Click the “Sales Tax Group” option.

Step 2: Create A Group Name Or Number

Create a name for your Sales Tax Group.

How To Add Sales Tax In QuickBooks Pro

Step 3: Write A Description

Customize your sales tax group description.

How To Add Sales Tax In QuickBooks Pro

Step 4: Select The Appropriate Tax Items

Now, you’ll need to add all of the individual Sales Tax Items that make up your combined Sales Tax Group by using the drop-down menu under Tax Item. If you need help determining which rate you need to include, refer to our Small Business Sales Tax Guide.

How To Add Sales Tax In QuickBooks Pro

Step 5: Save Your Sales Tax Group

Click the blue “OK” button to save your sales tax group.

How To Add Sales Tax In QuickBooks Pro

Repeat this process until all of your sales tax rates are successfully created, and you’re in business (literally). Once you’ve added your sales tax rates you can begin creating invoices and running your business!

If you have any troubleshooting issues, check out the QuickBooks Community or call QuickBooks directly. Or, if you want to learn more about sales tax, read our complete Small Business Sales Tax Guide. And as always, if you have any further questions, leave a comment below and we’ll do our best to help you.

Chelsea Krause

Chelsea Krause is a writer, avid reader, and researcher. In addition to loving writing, she became interested in accounting software because of her constant desire to learn something new and understand how things work. When she’s not working or daydreaming about her newest story, she can be found drinking obscene amounts of coffee, reading anything written by C.S. Lewis or Ray Bradbury, kayaking and hiking, or watching The X-Files with her husband.

Chelsea Krause

“”

How To Create An Estimate In QuickBooks Pro

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How to Create an Estimate in QuickBooks Pro

As a small business owner, you are always looking for new business leads. One of the best parts about QuickBooks Pro is being able to easily send professional estimates to potential clients.

We’ve broken the process down into 13 easy-to-follow steps.

Table of Contents

Create An Estimate

It’s a good idea to customize your estimate templates before you start sending them to clients. If you need help doing this, you can use the same process outlined in our post: How to Customize Invoice Templates In QuickBooks Pro.

Once the template is to your liking, start creating an estimate by going to Customer>Create Estimates.

Step 1: Select A Customer

Begin by selecting the customer you want to send an estimate to from the drop-down menu. If you can’t find the customer, you can click “Small Business Sales Tax Guide.

Step 9: Write A Customer Message

While this field is technically optional, we highly recommend adding a customer message.

QuickBooks makes it easy. You can select one of five preset customer messages using the drop-down menu, or you can click “QuickBooks Community or call QuickBooks directly. If you have any further questions, leave a comment below and we’ll do our best to help you.

Chelsea Krause

Chelsea Krause is a writer, avid reader, and researcher. In addition to loving writing, she became interested in accounting software because of her constant desire to learn something new and understand how things work. When she’s not working or daydreaming about her newest story, she can be found drinking obscene amounts of coffee, reading anything written by C.S. Lewis or Ray Bradbury, kayaking and hiking, or watching The X-Files with her husband.

Chelsea Krause

“”

How To Customize Invoice Templates In QuickBooks Pro

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How to Customize Invoices in QuickBooks Pro

QuickBooks Pro has many strengths, but invoice template creation just isn’t one of them. And the last thing you want is to send your clients unattractive invoices.

In this post, I’ll teach you how to take your invoices from this…

How to Customize Invoices in QuickBooks Pro

to this…

How to Customize Invoices in QuickBooks Pro

…without having to pay extra for a customized invoice template. Using eight simple steps and a bit of TLC, you can impress your customers with attractive, professional invoices in no time.

Table of Contents

Step 1: Select A Default Template

Choose a default template. QuickBooks gives you four choices:

  • Intuit Packing Slip
  • Intuit Product Invoice Slip
  • Intuit Professional Invoice
  • Intuit Service Invoice

How to Customize Invoices in QuickBooks Pro

Once you’ve made your selection, click the blue “OK” button on the bottom of the screen. You should be taken to a screen that looks like this:

How to Customize Invoices in QuickBooks Pro

There are a ton of invoice customizations available. Most of these steps can be done in any order you please, so we’re just going to make our way down the Basic Customization screen.

To start, if you want to add a business logo, check the “Use logo” box. Then click “Select Logo…”

How to Customize Invoices in QuickBooks Pro

Browse your files to find the appropriate logo. Click on the file, then click “Open.”

How to Customize Invoices in QuickBooks Pro

Step 3: Select A Color Scheme

Select a color scheme using the drop-down menu. You can choose between:

  • Black
  • Gray
  • Maroon
  • Green
  • Beige

How to Customize Invoices in QuickBooks Pro

If you change the color scheme, your invoice will look something like this:

How to Customize Invoices in QuickBooks Pro

Click the “Apply Color Scheme” button to see your color scheme choice in action.

Step 4: Choose A Font

To alter the font, use the scroll bar menu to choose what you want to change.

How to Customize Invoice in QuickBooks Pro

At this point, you can choose specific fonts for these sections (there are further font customizations later):

  • Invoice title
  • Company name
  • Company Address
  • Labels
  • Data
  • Subtotals label
  • Total label

Once you make your selection, click “Change font.” QuickBooks uses the Microsoft Word font bank on your computer to offer font selections. You can change the font, color, and size.

How to Customize Invoices in QuickBooks Pro

Once your font looks right, click the “OK ” button in the top right-hand corner.

Step 5: Display the Appropriate Contact Information

Choose what business contact information you want to appear on your invoices. We recommend including your company name, company address, and phone number (at the very least). Check the boxes next to the information you want to include.

How to Customize Invoices in QuickBooks Pro

You’ll most likely receive a message that says:

How to Customize Invoices in QuickBooks Pro

Don’t worry. We’ll address that in step 7, so you can click “OK” and ignore that message for now.

If you need to update any of the company information included on your invoice, click the “Update Information” button. Enter the proper information and click the blue “OK” button when done.

How to Customize Invoices in QuickBooks Pro

Step 6: Decide What Information To Include

To change what information is and isn’t seen on your invoice, click the “Additional Customizations” button on the bottom of the screen. You’ll be taken to a screen that looks like this:

How to Customize Invoices in QuickBooks Pro

You can customize the invoice header, columns, footer, and print defaults. Simply check the boxes for the information you want to include and change the title if needed. Don’t click the blue “OK” button quite yet (unless you want to save a copy of your progress and continue customizing the invoice later).

Step 7: Customize With Layout Designer

Next, click the “Layout Designer…” button on the bottom of the screen. You should then be taken to a screen that looks like this.

How to Customize Invoices in QuickBooks Pro

Note: The green boxes on the screen indicate envelope windows.

Here’s where the fun begins. In the layout designer, you can change the size and position of all the information on your invoice. When you select a box, you can resize it, drag it to a new location, or click the “Properties” button for more customization options (like fonts, font colors, borders, fill colors, and more).

How to Customize Invoices in QuickBooks Pro

You can add images and backgrounds to your invoices as well. The only thing you can’t customize is the fill colors of certain headers (Item Cost, Description, Price, Amount).

We added color to our invoice and an image which we used as a header. We also rearranged the placement of our data to make it more appealing. We also took time to make the invoice due date and total due clear for customers.

How to Customize Invoices in QuickBooks Pro

Tip: Use the “Copy Format” button at the top of the screen so you don’t have to reenter the same design formatting for every single box.

When you’re done editing your invoice, click the blue “OK” button on the bottom of the screen.

Step 8: Save Your Invoice Template

Take on final look at your invoice preview. If you invoice looks correct, click the blue “OK” button.

You’ve officially customized your invoices; now you can start sending them and getting paid! Follow these same eight steps to customize your estimate templates (simply go to List>Templates to find your estimate templates).

Keep watching our QuickBooks Desktop Pro 101 Series for more tips, including how to send invoices and estimates.

If you have any troubleshooting issues, check out the QuickBooks Community or call QuickBooks directly. If you have any further questions, leave a comment below and we’ll do our best to help you.

Chelsea Krause

Chelsea Krause is a writer, avid reader, and researcher. In addition to loving writing, she became interested in accounting software because of her constant desire to learn something new and understand how things work. When she’s not working or daydreaming about her newest story, she can be found drinking obscene amounts of coffee, reading anything written by C.S. Lewis or Ray Bradbury, kayaking and hiking, or watching The X-Files with her husband.

Chelsea Krause

“”