Everything You Need To Know About eCommerce Payments

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The Complete Guide To Finding An Internet Merchant Account

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The Merchant’s Guide To Recurring Payments And Billing

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What Is Cardholder Data And Why Does It Matter?

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Digital Wallets VS Mobile Wallets

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How To Accept Donations Online

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How to Accept Online Payments With Square

When you are ready to start selling online, Square (read our review) offers a wide variety of options depending on your skill level and needs. For example, if time is of the essence or you don’t want to fuss with code, build a free online store from Square’s templates and get up and running by the end of the day.

Already have a site? Choose a plugin integration from the Square Dashboard that solves your problem — without the need for code.

But those aren’t all of your options. If you do have developer expertise, you can build your checkout flow with Square Transactions API and start accepting all major credit cards with digital wallet support, too.  Square Checkout is yet another developer option that requires less coding with a pre-built payment form and digital wallet support.

In this post, we’ll explore each path so that you can get the facts and navigate to the choices right for you. Before you know it, you’ll have launched your own online store and can move on to more exciting business matters.

Note: If you’re also curious about in-store payments, check out our related post, How To Use Square To Accept Credit Cards In Person.

Webstore Integrations Developers

Build Your Webstore Quickly & Easily

Integrate With Popular eCommerce Software

Developer-Friendly Tools For Customization

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Highlights:

  • No coding required
  • Free personalized URL
  • Premade customizable themes
  • No hosting fees
  • Manage from your Dashboard
  • Mobile-ready storefront
  • Integrate with your in-person store

Integrate with:

  • WooCommerce
  • BigCommerce
  • Ecwid
  • 3dcart
  • OpenCart
  • Zen Cart
  • Weebly
  • WordPress.com
  • Wix
  • +More

Highlights:

  • API for custom solutions
  • In-person solutions
  • Online solutions
  • Card reader SDK
  • Customer management solutions
  • PCI and EMV compliance
  • End-to-end encryption
  • Dispute management
  • Fraud detection

Instant Account Setup

Fast Funding

No Monthly Fees

2.90% + $0.30 for online sales

Instant Account Setup

Fast Funding

No Monthly Fees

2.90% + $0.30 for online sales

Instant Account Setup

Fast Funding

No Monthly Fees

2.90% + $0.30 for online sales

How Much Does Square Charge For Online Payments?

The cost question can be a very loaded one when it comes to payment processing. The great news is that Square offers a transparent pricing model.

To process credit cards online with Square, you’ll pay 2.9% + $0.30 per transaction. The significant thing to note is that this flat fee encompasses much more than is typical with traditional merchant accounts. For instance, you don’t need to worry about a payment gateway (and the expenses that go with it) when you process through Square. Read on below to learn the differences between Square and a traditional merchant account — and why they matter.

Traditional Merchant Account Vs. Square

Square’s hardware and services encompass an end-to-end processing system that captures payment information and encrypts it through the payment chain with no need for a separate payment gateway.

What this means for you is cost-savings compared to a traditional merchant account. You won’t be paying initial set-up fees, PCI compliance fees, monthly account fees, batch fees, or higher rates for processing cards like American Express. Square also doesn’t assess any chargeback fees and offers merchants up to $250/month in chargeback protection. All of this is a pretty big deal because Square spares business owners from the laundry list of itemized charges that can come with traditional merchant accounts.

So if Square isn’t a traditional merchant account, what is it? Square is a third party processor. This means that instead of opening a merchant account directly, you are basically a sub-user on Square’s giant merchant account, along with all of Square’s other customers. Square acts as a payment processor and also assumes the financial risk associated with your business to do so. The whole premise behind Square is that it makes setting up a shop very easy for the busy entrepreneur. In fact, you can get an account set up and running to take payment the very same day. The Square sign-up process doesn’t even require a credit check!

While you don’t need to jump through a lot of hoops to open up an account with Square (as you would working directly with a bank), Square is more apt to terminate or put a hold on an account if certain red flags are raised. While the overwhelming majority of businesses will never have a problem with an account hold, it can be disconcerting if it happens to you. Check out our post How to Avoid Merchant Account Holds, Freezes, and Terminations to find out more. Again, most merchants will likely never have to face this issue, but it helps to cover your bases.

Now that we have covered Square Payments as a third party processor and the cost of processing, let’s dig into Square’s offerings when it comes to going live and selling online.

Option 1: Build A Free Square Online Store

Square Store Template

As I said in the introduction, you can get a free Square store up and running today with no technical expertise needed. This whole process is powered by Square Payments and Weebly (read our review). After creating a Square account, you can go back into your dashboard and select “Online Store” in the menu. Then, Square leads you through the process of selecting the categories that most closely apply to your business. You’ll get a suggested template, but you can choose a different one if you fancy another one better. You can also add your logo, choose from limited fonts, and have some color choices, but overall the design freedom here is limited to the template itself.

Again, for being free, there isn’t much to complain about. A Square store is the simplest solution to get your shop up and running. All you need to do is add your products — your eCommerce shop syncs with Square POS and all of the other Square software and tools. Your inventory automatically updates when you sell an item, too.

One potential drawback to the freemium option, however, is that you are bound to the Weebly logo in your domain name and the footer of your website, and your shipping options are minimal. The screenshot below shows the shipping options available when setting up the free Square store with Weebly. Note that you must upgrade your Weebly plan to calculate real-time shipping rates:

Square Free Store Shipping Setup

If you want a bit more customization and dynamic shipping calculations (among other upgrades), you can purchase a domain and upgrade to a professional or premium account through Weebly.

Square Online Store Upgrade Options

Square and Weebly

The free online store option, although robust in its own way, limits you a bit. As you can see from above, for example, if your company relies heavily on shipping items with large size or weight ranges, it may be worth it to you to go to the Premium eCommerce plan for the real-time shipping rate calculator and accurate rates for UPS, FedEx, or other third party carriers.

The free store also has a 500 MB storage space limit, which could limit the number of photos on your site. The paid tiers give you a considerable upgrade with unlimited space, along with website analytics and insights.

As far as accepting payment goes, you can accept all major credit cards. Digital wallets like Apple Pay are not supported at this time, but I suspect they will be soon. For more about the pros and cons of this solution, check out our Square Online Store and eCommerce Review.

Option 2: Connect Square To An eCommerce Platform

Square eCommerce Apps

Whether you already have your site up and running or you are building your site from the ground up (or somewhere in between), you can probably find what you need in the Square App Marketplace. Square integrates with many eCommerce platforms, including:

  • 3dcart (read our review)
  • Wix (read our review)
  • BigCommerce (read our review)
  • WooCommerce (read our review)
  • Ecwid (read our review)

And of course — let’s not forget that Square also integrates with Weebly, as well as WordPress and WP EasyCart.

On the topic of app integrations and Square, it’s worth noting that Square can easily integrate with a range of different types of apps that you can shop for right from your dashboard. You can find everything from accounting to invoicing, employee management, loyalty and rewards, and marketing, to name a few. Pricing depends entirely on the apps themselves, but the Square App Marketplace is set up to compare costs easily.

All of Square’s basic eCommerce features integrate with these apps, so you’ll be able to enjoy the same payment processing rates, security protection, and inventory updates as you sell. Of course, each app platform has specific features and benefits, so the finished product (and look) varies depending on the integrated solution you choose. Check out The Best eCommerce Integrations That Work With Square Payments for our top picks!

Option 3: Build Your Own Checkout With Square APIs

If you already have your own site and you have developer expertise, then you have two more options thanks to Square API: Square Checkout and Transactions API. The most significant difference between the two is that Square Checkout is much closer to an out-of-the-box solution. With Square Checkout, Square is actually hosting the payment form, and the UI is already done for you. If you want more freedom in the checkout and payment UI and you want to host the payment form on your site with customized branding, you can opt for Square Transactions API.

Here is a handy side-by-side comparison chart to give you an overview of what you can expect with each solution. Note: All Square APIs and SDKs are free to use. As always, you pay only the payment processing fees.

Square Checkout Feature Square Transactions API
Yes Requires Developer Support Yes
No Can Customize Yes
Yes Square Hosted No (You host)
Yes Store Customer Data Yes (With integration)
No Card on File & Recurring Payments Yes (With integration)
Yes (Customer data
& itemization)
Detailed Dashboard Reports No (Transaction
amount only)
Recommended,
not required
SSL Needed Yes, with
separate integration
Yes Eligible for Chargeback Protection Yes (with conditions)
Yes Data Encryption Yes
Yes PCI Compliance Included Yes
Yes Itemization Yes, with Orders API
No Dynamic Shipping Calculations No
Yes Accept Google Pay Yes
Yes Accept Apple Pay Yes
No Accept MasterPass Yes
Yes Accept All Major Credit Cards Yes
Yes Inventory Syncing Yes, with Inventory API

The choice between Square API and Transactions API largely depends on your particular needs and what you find most important in the customer journey.

Other Ways To Accept Online Payments With Square

Square Developer In-App

Though we have explored several options in Square payments, there are yet a few more to keep in mind. Before we go on, it’s worth mentioning that you can’t add an embeddable “Buy Now” button to any site like you can with PayPal or even Shopify. However, there are still ways to take payments online — even without a website! Let’s check out the last two ways you can take payments via Square from your customer online — through invoices and in-app payments.

Invoices

Square Invoices

You don’t need an online store to send and collect payment from your customers if you use invoices. Square allows you to send one-off invoices for single orders, or to set up recurring invoices for subscriptions or even installments. It’s easy to track the status of invoices and follow up right from your Square Dashboard, too. Want more info on invoices? Check out How To Use Square Invoices To Ensure You Get Paid On Time so you can leverage this option for your business.

In-App Payments

With all the cash being exchanged through in-app purchases, it was only a matter of time before Square decided to join the party. That’s right; now Square offers in-app payment support with a few lines of code! You can update elements to match your app’s style and have the freedom to customize the look and feel however you want. It’s all in Square’s Transaction APIs and completely free for you to use with your Square account.

Is Square Online Payments Right For You?

Square offers solutions for both the tech-savvy and those who want something ready to run out of the box. With that being said, the more appropriate question is, “Which of Square Online Payment solutions are right for you?” And that answer comes down to your needs. From a quick-to-set up Square Store to Transaction APIs that are customizable and free to us, or plug-ins apps that add eCommerce to your existing site, there are many solutions to choose.

Keep in mind that you can add or subtract Square’s services and other integrations to scale up or down with you as needed, so you don’t have to make a final decision today. Setting up a Square account is the first step to get the ball rolling and see the options along the way. With no sign-up fees, binding contracts, or credit checks, Square is one of the least intimating companies to deal with if you are just checking things out.

The post How to Accept Online Payments With Square appeared first on Merchant Maverick.

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How to Use Square for Recurring Payments And Invoices

Subscription-based business models seem to be everywhere these days. Emerging wine clubs, personal care-in-a-box subscriptions, wardrobe-of-the-month sites — even supporting a favorite podcast! Clearly, these types of businesses are finding success as people jump into subscriptions to save money, time, or just for the fun of getting a box in the mail. And it’s not just cheese-of-the-month clubs anymore. Software as a Service (SaaS) subscriptions are booming in both business and personal markets. This environment is ripe for subscription business models, but you need the right tools to process recurring payments while protecting your business from security risks.

Of course, businesses that serve a local market with more traditional recurring products and services like gyms, childcare, or home improvement services also rely on recurring payments for their revenue stream — whether that’s automatically charging a credit card or manually sending an invoice.

Choosing a payment processor for this type of business is not a light decision, so let’s take a look at what Square has to offer in terms of solutions geared for the recurring payment model.

How To Set Up Recurring Payments With Square eCommerce

If you are about to launch an eCommerce subscription-based business or you are looking for a different payment processing setup than the one you have, Square should be on your radar. While Square doesn’t provide complete “out-of-the-box” solutions for eCommerce businesses, they offer three main options for you to get your shop live, with some flexibility under each.

Square Payment Form and Transaction API:

If you are a developer or have the in-house developer support, you can create a custom payment experience that resembles the rest of your site. That means you can save a card on file using the Square Payment Form and set up recurring billing using your own subscription logic. Square also has digital wallet support so you can add Apple Pay, Google Pay, or MasterPass for faster checkout. Here’s more information directly from Square if you opt to embed the payment form:

Square Payment Form provides secure, hosted components for payment data like card number and CVV, while enabling you to make it your own. It’s designed to help buyers enter their card data accurately and quickly. Card data is collected securely and tokenized, never hitting your servers, so you don’t have to worry about PCI compliance.

Pre-Built Workflow:

When you integrate Square Checkout, you can save a card on file safely, and you won’t need as much developer knowledge. This solution is a pre-built workflow that includes digital wallet support, and it’s all hosted on Square’s servers. You won’t have as much wiggle room in regards to customization, but it’s still going to give you a fast, streamlined checkout experience. Square provides a technical reference guide to assist you in building what you need, including setting up recurring billing.

Choose An Integration:

If you want a simpler solution that doesn’t require coding or technical expertise, a plug-in may be just the ticket for you to get up and running quickly. Of all the options available within the Square Dashboard, Chargify jumps out because it seems to offer everything a subscription service would need. According to Chargify:

Chargify bills your customer’s credit card on whatever schedule you define. In addition to processing one-time and recurring transactions, Chargify can handle free trial periods, one-time fees, promotions, refunds, email receipts, and even dunning (reminders for failed credit card payments) management.

Chargify plans start at $99 a month, but you can work your way up the scale when it comes to additional options. In general, Square plug-in selections abound, so you can shop to find the most promising solution for your business right from your Square Dashboard under Apps. Here’s a screenshot of a few options listed:

Square Integration Plug Ins

No matter which solution you decide on, you can rest assured that the burden of PCI compliance and security with payment processing sits on Square’s shoulders, not your own. And the free support you get from Square’s team if there is a chargeback issue also gives some much-needed peace of mind as well.

To find out more and shop eCommerce solutions, head to Square’s website and select eCommerce under the section, Software services to grow your business. If you want to learn more before signing up, read our post, The Best eCommerce Integrations That Work With Square Payments. And if you want to find out more about Square as an eCommerce solution in general, check out our Square Online Store and eCommerce Review.

How To Set Up Square Recurring Invoices

When you’re ready to set up a recurring invoice for your customer, Square makes it easy. You can create an invoice through your Square POS app or from the Square Dashboard. You can then set up the scheduling frequency of your recurring invoice, though you will need your customer to approve their card on file.

Whether you send a one-time or recurring invoice, enable Allow Customer to Save Card on File so your customer can approve. Then you’ll be all set for repeat billing.

Note: If you need to manually save a card on file from your Virtual Terminal at your computer, you’ll need to print out the approval form so your customer can sign it first.

Here’s a screenshot of what the setup looks like for recurring invoices within the Square Dashboard.

Square Recurring Invoice

With Square Invoices, you can also request a deposit, either due immediately or within a specific time-frame. So for you business owners that charge a sign-up or other set-up fee, you can seamlessly add in a deposit request and cover all the bases.

Getting Paid with Square Invoices

When your customer makes a payment, credit card payments update automatically in their invoice. Your customer follows the Pay Now prompt to enter their details and can also approve saving the card on file.

Did your customer send a check or pay you by cash? You can also record payment manually when you open up the invoice. If your customer wants to pay over the phone, you can process the amount on your computer through the Square Virtual Terminal located within the Square Dashboard. And finally, you can process in-person payments and apply them directly to the invoice by swiping, dipping, or tapping your customer’s card to your connected Square Reader. Just make sure you go into Invoices and apply the payment to the existing customer invoice.

Square Invoices (read our review) also makes it easy to track when your customer saw your invoice and any activity within the account. You can quickly send a message to follow up or edit the invoice any time from your Square Dashboard.

How To Use Square Installments For Invoices

Another solution that may boost sales is offering payment plans through Square Installments. Square Installments for Invoices finances the cost for your customer, so there’s no need for you to invoice repeatedly; instead, you are paid upfront and in full by Square. Square Installments is currently only available to select businesses, however. You’ll need to apply, and if you are approved, the Installments option automatically appears as a payment option on your invoices and Square POS.

When your customer chooses Installments (either via their invoice or your Square POS), they’ll apply directly with Square Capital at the time of the sale. If they are approved, the balance is reflected in your account. Also note that after the sale, Square Capital takes on the liability of the charge, so you won’t deal with collecting or processing payments. In fact, Square instructs any merchant to direct all questions or issues your customer may have with their installment payments to Square Installments directly. Find out more about it on our post, How Does Customer Financing Through Square Installment Work?

How Much Do Recurring Payments Cost With Square?

What is cheaper than Square?

Below is a breakdown of Square’s payment processing per transaction. When you crunch the numbers, keep in mind that you are getting an all-in-one solution as far as payment security with PCI compliance and chargeback support. Square doesn’t charge monthly service fees either, so what you see is what you get as far as costs go.

  • Invoice paid with card by customer: 2.9% + $0.30
  • Invoice paid with card on file: 3.5% + $0.15
  • eCommerce processing: 2.9% + $0.30
  • Square Installments for Invoices: 2.9% of the purchase price + $0.30
  • Square Installments at your Point of sale: 3.5% of the purchase price + $0.15
  • Square online payment API and SKIs: Free for developers to use + eCommerce processing fee
  • Plug-in apps integrated with Square: Price varies with each software provider

Should You Use Square’s Recurring Payments Tools?

Setting up recurring payments for your customers takes a little bit more forethought and prep than a one-off charge. However, Square makes recurring invoices accessible by offering a range of solutions for both eCommerce and brick-and-mortar shops.

As far as third-party processors and eCommerce go, Square offers similar solutions as its peers. In other words, you’ll likely need the help of a developer with any option you choose, including PayPal or Stripe — unless you opt for a plug-in app. That being said, Square enables you to get eCommerce up and running safely — whether that is through a pre-built workflow, easy integration with a plug-in app, or API developer tools. (If you do have the developer expertise and a bit more wiggle-room in your budget, it’s worth mentioning that Stripe affords greater freedom to customize the whole process, add advanced reporting features, and a lot more. But you can’t be shy with code!)

Still curious about Square? Why not give them a try and see for yourself? There is no fee to sign up and no binding contract required, so setting up an account may be the next step for you. You can also head over to our Square Review and read how it compares to the other solutions out there.

The post How to Use Square for Recurring Payments And Invoices appeared first on Merchant Maverick.

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What Is A Card-Not-Present Transaction?

It’s safe to say that nothing is ever free in payment processing (and if it claims to be, you should be very suspicious). But trying to understand why some types of transactions cost more than others to process can be a confusing and sometimes overwhelming process. For example, why does Square charge 3.5% + $0.15 for keyed transactions and just 2.75% for swiped, dipped, and tapped transactions, even though they both go through the Point of Sale app? Why do invoices and online orders cost more than payments processed with a POS app and credit card reader? The answer is that it matters whether a transaction is deemed “card-present” or “card-not-present” (CNP)  — in fact, it is a critical factor in payment processing costs.

A card-not-present sale is any transaction where the cardholder does not present their card to the merchant. While that general definition may seem pretty cut and dry, the reality is a bit muddier. Here’s what I mean: Even if your customer takes out their physical credit card, the transaction is not considered a “card-present sale” unless they actually swipe, dip, or tap it. Manually entering a card number throws the transaction into card-not-present territory.

And when a customer taps a credit card terminal with their phone at a coffee shop? That transaction is actually considered a card-present sale even though the merchant technically never sees a physical credit card!

Confused? Don’t worry. Keep reading; below, we’ll break down some more examples of card-not-present transactions and help you understand why they cost more to process. We’ll also talk about what — if anything — you need to change in your payment processing setup to protect your business.

The reality is, whether you have a brick-and-mortar store or you run an eCommerce business, you need to understand how CNP transactions affect your business, your customers, and your bottom line. There’s much more than meets the eye when it comes to distinguishing from a card-not-present and a card-present transaction, including how much it costs you and the security risks involved. Let’s dive in!

Card-Present VS Card-Not-Present Transactions

Let’s start by talking about what a card-not-present sale actually entails. Once we do that, these transactions will be a little easier for you to identify (and help your sales team navigate the whole issue as well.) A card-not-present sale is any sale processed that does not capture the electronic data of the card at the time of the sale.  

It’s not always super cut and dry. Sometimes merchants don’t understand that being handed a credit card doesn’t automatically qualify the transaction as a card-present sale. It all depends on how it is processed. For instance, say you are at a festival and decide to buy one-of-a-kind art from a vendor. You hand her your card, and she breaks out a little manual machine and makes a carbon copy. Even though you physically handed the vendor your card, this still counts as a card-not-present transaction. No electronic data was captured.

Another example involves Visa and Apple Pay. You can consider any in-store purchase made with Apple Pay a card-present sale, but any payments made using Apple Pay in-app are considered card-not-present. That’s because when a customer uses a digital wallet by tapping or scanning a QR in the store, the electronic data of the card is captured in real time. In-app purchases do not capture the electronic data at the time of the sale.

For the most part, the main thing to understand is that transaction categorization ultimately boils down to whether electronic data was captured.

Common Card-Not-Present Transactions:

  • Invoicing a client
  • eCommerce / online shopping
  • Phone orders
  • Recurring payments that are automatically billed (subscriptions)

Common Card-Present Transactions:

  • Countertop credit card terminals
  • Tapping or scanning digital wallets
  • Swiping via a card reader on a tablet or smartphone (e.g., Square)

If your revenue depends on processing payments with anything other than a POS app and credit card terminal or mobile card reader, it is worth your time to understand how to keep your transactions safe. Processing credit cards costs money whether you process in person or online, but you will face slightly higher fees for processing card-not-present transactions. 

Understanding The Cost Of Card-Not-Present Transactions

 

Why are you charged more for card-not-present transactions? It’s pretty simple, actually. Card-not-present transactions cost more because there are simply more ways for them to fail. From chargebacks, friendly fraud, and malicious fraud, there is more vulnerability and subsequent cost when things go wrong.  Granted, all credit card processing poses some risk — that’s why businesses have contracts with processors, and why high-risk merchant accounts exist. It comes down to which methods of payment processing (and sometimes even which businesses) present the most risk. 

With a merchant account that offers interchange-plus pricing, you will pay a higher interchange rate for card-not-present transactions because the card networks want a return in exchange for accepting some of the risk. Even third-party processors, which don’t overtly pass interchange costs directly to you, still build the costs in by adding a markup to their base rate.

It’s also important to understand that not all card-not-present transactions pose the same risks. For instance, you are generally going to pay a higher cost for a keyed-in entry than for an online transaction because there are typically some built-in security measures (like address and CVV verification) for online purchases, whereas there are no security measures for keyed transactions.

Want to know more about how credit card processing works? Check out The Complete Guide to Credit Card Processing Rates & Fees for an in-depth look. 

Below we talk more about card-not-present fraud and what you can do to protect your business. 

The Cost Of Fraud

Unfortunately, when it comes to CNP sales, the industry is currently seeing an increased rate of fraud for online transactions. The rollout of chip cards and the EMV liability shift in the US for card-present sales actually plays a major role in the increase of card-not-present fraud, and it’s something that financial experts predicted would happen based on EMV adoption in other parts of the world.

While we certainly don’t want to strike fear or dread into any of our readers, the fact is that card-not-present transactions make you more vulnerable to fraud because the physical card data can’t be verified. Not only can a card data breach turn into an embarrassing public relations issue, but the business owner is ultimately responsible for absorbing the cost of any fraudulent charges in a card-not-present sale.

A recent press release from LexisNexis demonstrates that the cost of fraud is rising. Last year, every dollar ($1) of fraud cost a merchant $2.77. This year, it’s predicted to cost $2.94 on average. And if you are in the digital space, the cost is even a bit higher.

Small businesses need to stay on guard just as much as any medium or large business. The unfortunate fact is that fraudsters are looking for vulnerabilities like outdated data security practices, and small businesses are very likely to be targeted.

There are some very sobering statistics from UPS Capital:

  • Nearly 90% of small and medium-sized businesses in the U.S. don’t use data protection for company and customer information.
  • Less than half have secure company email processes to prevent phishing scams.
  • 60% of smaller businesses are out of business within six months of suffering a cyber attack.

It is vitally important to be aware of the risks and know how to protect yourself.

Read on to learn more about fraud and what you can do to protect your business if you accept card-not-present transactions.

Protecting Your Business From Fraud

Merchant’s Guide to Preventing Card-Present Fraud image

Taking a proactive approach to preventing fraud is a smart move. In this post, we focus on understanding the risks and cost of card-not-present transactions, but card-present sales are certainly not exempt from fraud. If your business processes both types, check out the Merchant’s Guide to Preventing Card-Present Fraud for a great breakdown of information on how to protect your business from card-present security issues.

Your first defense against fraud will always be PCI compliance. PCI DSS is an acronym for Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard, which dictates the industry-standard procedures and security measures a business needs to make to protect customer data.

The good news is that unless you are dealing with homegrown software for your payment processing system, you are likely operating with PCI compliant equipment and software. That’s because all payment processing software and equipment vendors go through a strict certification process to ensure their products meet industry standards for security. 

That being said, you still need to take the time to read your contract and understand if there are any steps you need to take to ensure continued compliance. Third-party payment processors such as Square are automatically PCI compliant and do not require you to do anything specific to maintain compliance — at least not as far as the contract is concerned. (As a general rule, you should keep yourself informed on PCI compliance and what constitutes a suspicious transaction that could get your account flagged for fraud.) 

With merchant accounts, PCI compliance is a lot more varied and partially depends on whether you use the provided software or integrate with a third-party. You may be obligated to complete a scan or assessments, or potentially much more depending on your payment processing setup.

The key takeaway is this: PCI compliance is never a one-time event. Assessment, remediation, and reporting is a continual process with best-practices changing each year. Even if your processor doesn’t require you to do anything to maintain compliance, it’s important to make sure you know what security best practices are.

According to the PCI DSS Quick Reference Guide, some habits can put you and your customers at risk for fraud. Within the guide, the PCI cites activities that are common across the board in all types of U.S. and European businesses (page 4):

  • 81% store payment card numbers
  • 73% store payment card expiration dates
  • 71% store payment verification codes
  • 57% store customer data from the payment card magnetic strip
  • 16% store other personal data

Let’s break down that first statistic. The majority of business owners store their customers’ credit card numbers. But where? Unless you’re using PCI compliant software with a secure credit card vault, you could be exposing yourself to risk and liability — big time. 

Following best practices and keeping yourself up-to-date with PCI compliance is one of the most important things you can do to prevent fraud. Another thing to remember is that it is up to you to ensure your team knows what not to do, too. A retail employee who keys in the majority of her transactions may be helping others commit fraud — or she may simply have trouble getting the credit card terminal’s card readers to work. But you won’t know until you check up on her. 

Once your bases are covered with PCI compliance, you can rest easy knowing that your legal and liability concerns have at least been reasonably mitigated.

Additional layers of security may be worth looking into as well, especially if your livelihood involves online sales

  • Address Verification System (AVS): This system checks to see if your customer’s address is the same as the person who owns the credit card. Verifying the billing address or zip code against Visa or MasterCard billing information of the cardholder can prevent misuse and protect your business from fraud.
  • CVV Checks: A CVV check requires your customers to enter in the additional three numbers at the back of the card (four digits for American Express). Since this information can be stored (and also stolen), it also makes sense to require customers to re-enter the card code whenever there is an unrecognized device or change to a shipping address.
  • 3-D Secure: This provides an extra layer of security for online transactions. If you have heard of MasterCard SecureCode, Verified by Visa, or American Express Safekey, then you are familiar with 3-D Secure. MasterCard SecureCode, for instance, requires a PIN code to be entered into an inline window that is securely hosted by the issuing bank. The code is never shared with you directly. This authentication step is designed to reduce your liability and improve security. Many processors that cater specifically to online businesses, such as Stripe, offer 3D Secure bundled with their services.

Final Thoughts

Fully grasping the nuances of credit card processing can be difficult. However, it’s definitely worth taking a bit of time to understand how and why card-not-present transactions are different from card-present payment processing.

Even merchants who run brick-and-mortar shops have to deal with the cost of CNP payments. If you have a storefront shop, taking the time to train your team to spot the difference between the two types of transactions and keeping up with the latest compliant software/EMV readers will go a long way towards keeping your costs down —and your payment security tighter.

If you run an online business, your focus should be on making sure you have the appropriate security measures enabled with a good payment processor — preferably one that does the bulk of the work for you! At the end of the day, you will take the hit from chargebacks and fraud if you don’t have the right protections. 

Shopping around for eCommerce businesses solutions? Read How To Choose An eCommerce Merchant Account.

The post What Is A Card-Not-Present Transaction? appeared first on Merchant Maverick.

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Square’s Customer Service: Why It Works So Well And How To Use It

If you’re considering whether the Square payment processing solution is best for your business, it makes sense to ask about their customer service. For many of us, the customer service experience makes or breaks the way we feel about a company, even if we love everything else about the product. And the truth is that positive — and negative — interactions with customer service can have serious repercussions — especially when you’re trying to run an efficient, successful business and keep your own customers happy.

Not too long ago, Square suffered from a less-than-stellar reputation for customer service, but that is changing. Any company that can identify a pattern in user issues and beef up their service is one that values user experience and trust. And that is a good sign for current users.

For this post, we examined all the negative complaints about Square’s customer service in our complete Square Review and found that the biggest issue that has since been improved is Square’s phone support (more on that below).

We also dug deep into the Square customer service experience to form our own impressions. (Keep in mind that we are looking here at Square’s business products, not the Square Cash App, which has an entirely different support team. But if you’re looking for information on that, we have you covered there, too. Check out our Square Cash App Review.)

When it comes to Square Support, the user experience has clearly been well thought out. When you visit the Support page, you will immediately see a lot of ways to find the help you need, and the available material is straightforward to navigate and easy to understand.

Below, we break it all down for you so that you can make the most of Square’s help features and find what you need in a crunch.

Note: To keep things in perspective, the vast majority of Square users (over 2 million) are happy with their experience, including customer service. We spend a lot of time sifting through information (including reviews) and understand that negativity bias can affect any anyone. We talk a lot more about that and how we handle the phenomenon here at Merchant Maverick in our post, Understanding Negativity Bias. 

Reader eCommerce Retail Food Service
Free App & Reader Square eCommerce Square for Retail Square for Restaurants
Get Started Get Started Get Started Get Started
Free, general-purpose POS software and reader for iOS and Android Easy integration with popular platforms plus API for customization Specialized software for more complex retail stores Specialized software for full-service restaurants
$0/month $0/month $60/month $60/month
Always Free Always Free Free Trial Free Trial

Square’s Support Center

When you have a question, you can probably find what you need through the prompts and easy-to-digest information within Square’s troubleshooting articles. They provide a wealth of information on everything from setting up your Square account to tips for using your card reader, troubleshooting any issues, and changing settings.

Support material is laid out in a table of contents, and each section is expandable. You don’t have to wade through a ton of text or scroll to find what you need because everything is organized by topic. Already know exactly what you need? You can just type in what you are looking for and simplify your hunt even more. It’s also possible to enter a question or search keywords and topics from any page in the help section. The search feature is very intelligent and can auto-suggest articles for you to explore. 

Square Compatibility Checker

Wondering if your smartphone or tablet will work with Square? Rather than searching the knowledgebase for a list, you can use Square’s Compatibility checker. Just enter in the make and model of your device and Square will tell you which card readers and other pieces of hardware are compatible (and which aren’t). This is a great way to make sure you don’t unnecessarily buy new devices even before you sign up with Square, or you can check whether the new device you’re planning to buy will actually still work with your hardware.

Issue Tracking

Having trouble using one of Square’s products? If you are looking for a quick way to see if everything on Square’s end checks out, you can head to https://www.issquareup.com/ and see whether an issue is on your end or theirs. 

Square Community Forum

 

Square has set up an excellent and unusually active hub for sellers to collaborate, get ideas, and problem-solve with its community forum, known as the Seller Community. You need to be a Square user to join, but once you’ve signed in, you can post your questions. And you’ll probably get a response more quickly than you expect! The forum is organized by popular topics, and directly below the fold you can jump right in and view recent discussions. 

Within the Seller Community, you can also search by keyword or for specific community members. There are spots dedicated to those who are new to Square, as well as a general discussion page, a dedicated forum for questions, and a place just for Square staff to share product updates (so you can stay in the know about any new features).

You’ll see that the Square staff are quite active on the forum, answering questions and even encouraging members to submit feature requests to the development team. It’s a pretty happening place when you start digging in.

Email & Social Media

If you have a question that requires a bit more personalized assistance, of course, you can still send Square’s support team a message through email or social media. Square has a dedicated Twitter support page, @SqSupport, for technical questions, or you can message the company’s Facebook page.

You can email Square even if you aren’t a Square user, but if you do have an account, Square will ask you to sign in and then choose the reason for reaching out.

After signing in and connecting to the service that applies to you, they provide you with contact details to get you matched with the right person.  In the meantime, you still have the option of checking out the Seller Community or looking through the support topics Square has published on its site.

Phone Support

Square has made a smart move by having actual employees (who collaborate with Square engineers) handle customer service questions. Speaking to a customer service rep who has inherent knowledge about a product can make a big difference when it comes to technical or even workflow questions. A few short years ago that wasn’t the case at Square, but we are glad that they responded to give the people what they wanted. 

To get your more complicated questions answered, you can access live help when you need it. This live support is only available to existing customers, however. You’ll get a customer code on the Square help page which you can use to patch you through to a person. 

Square’s phone support is active between the hours of 6 am to 6 pm Pacific time, Monday through Friday.

It’s comforting to know that phone support is an option, but thanks to the exhaustive help sections on their site, including the Square Seller Community, you’ll likely get the answers you need without having to call in.

Learn More About Square

If you already use Square, it might be a good idea to check out some of the resources in the help sections and even connect with other sellers in the community forum. Not only does ‘iron sharpen iron’ when it comes to running a business, but you might also discover how to take advantage of built-in features, like the Square Dashboard, to make your experience even better.

If you’re considering using Square to accept payments, you can sign up for a free account. With no monthly charges or hidden fees, chargeback protection, and full PCI compliance included, it’s easy to evaluate whether Square is right for you without external pressures influencing your choice.

Still not sure? Get more information by digging into Is Square a Secure Way to Accept Credit Cards or reading our full Square review.

Reader eCommerce Retail Food Service
Free App & Reader Square eCommerce Square for Retail Square for Restaurants
Get Started Get Started Get Started Get Started
Free, general-purpose POS software and reader for iOS and Android Easy integration with popular platforms plus API for customization Specialized software for more complex retail stores Specialized software for full-service restaurants
$0/month $0/month $60/month $60/month
Always Free Always Free Free Trial Free Trial

The post Square’s Customer Service: Why It Works So Well And How To Use It appeared first on Merchant Maverick.

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